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Here at uMore, we are committed to using rigorous scientific methods in the development of our mental well-being tracking app. Not only does that mean that we offer in-app self-help exercises based on real scientific evidence, but it also means that we are always analyzing the performance of the app at reducing stress.

Recently, our scientific team analyzed the anonymous stress scores of uMore’s first 4500 users. uMore users regularly use the app to complete the uMore Stress Index, which measures the users’ perceived level of stress. Scores range from 0 to 100, with scores between 0-35 indicating low stress, 35-65 indicating moderate stress, and above 65 indicating high stress. In this preliminary investigation, we analyzed the average stress scores from users at sign-up, and then during follow-up Stress Indexes.

Results suggest that average stress scores decrease over time as users check-in to complete the uMore Stress Index. The average stress score reported by users upon signing up was 56.2, a moderately high stress score. Upon 4 total check-ins in-app, users experienced a 3.25% reduction in stress scores from the baseline.

As shown by the graph, uMore users are experiencing reductions to their self-reported stress levels.

After having recently secured our first fundraising round, uMore is currently planning the development of large-scale scientific studies to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the app. These early results show promise for the use of a well-being tracking app as an early intervention to improve user mental health outcomes.

Written by Alejandro Serrano Saunders
Written by Alejandro Serrano Saunders

Alejandro is the Chief-Scientific Officer of uMore, the AI-powered mental well-being tracker.

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